Former Cricket World Cup stars endorse product linked to online betting company with dodgy ties – The New Indian Express

Express press service

CHENNAI: When Deepak Hooda was sent off for three against Sri Lanka in the Asian Cup on Tuesday, the Indian broadcaster’s exaggerated arm showed an advert from a betting company. 1xBet. It appeared as a pop-up at the bottom of the screen. Below the logo were the words “professional sports blog”.

At the far right of the pop-up ad was World Cup winner Yuvraj Singh, who has been promoting the company’s “professional sports blog” on Twitter since last December. This was of course not the only case where 1xBet was displayed on the OTT platform.

He made several appearances in the Asian Cup and in the fifth Test between India and England earlier this year. Suresh Raina also promoted the brand’s “professional sports blog” on his Twitter account (“professional sports blog” is a substitute).

What is important about the Asian Cup is that it is the first instance of a betting company as well as the OTT in question that strays from a notice issued by the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting in June. “…online betting advertisements are misleading and do not appear to be in strict compliance with the Consumer Protection Act 2019, the Advertising Code under the Television Networks Regulation Act 1995 cable and advertising standards under the standards of journalistic conduct established by the Press Council of India under the Press Council Act, 1978. In light of the foregoing and taking into account the wider public interest involved, print and electronic media are advised to refrain from publishing online betting platform advertisements.

Also, 1xBet raises several red flags. In 2019, the UK regulator launched an investigation before suspending all operations in the UK.

READ ALSO | Despite I&B ministry advice, airtime for substitute betting advertising

According to a The temperature, London, investigation, the betting company, founded in Russia, engaged in several illegal activities, including, but not limited to, a “casino pornhub”. This is a casino that sees a person involved in assisting at the gaming table go topless to tempt more players. He also took bets on children’s games.

The company has also run into trouble with regulators elsewhere. There was such a backlash in the UK that three Premier League clubs, Chelsea, Liverpool and Tottenham, had to cancel existing deals with the company.

When contacted by The new Indian Expressthe Advertising Standards Council of India (ASCI), have expressed concern.

“On the face of it, some of these ads may be in violation of different state laws because gambling is a state matter,” said Manisha Kapoor, CEO and secretary of ASCI, an agency that sets guidelines for advertising in different spheres. statement. “The MIB notice also asked broadcasters to refrain from this.”

Overall, online betting is illegal in the country, so advertisements of this nature violate the laws (there are some exceptions as gambling or betting is a state subject).

Raina and Yuvraj did not respond to questions. The OTT also did not respond to questions.

CHENNAI: When Deepak Hooda was sent off for three against Sri Lanka in the Asian Cup on Tuesday, the Indian broadcaster’s exaggerated arm showed an advert from a betting company. 1xBet. It appeared as a pop-up at the bottom of the screen. Below the logo were the words “professional sports blog”. At the far right of the pop-up ad was World Cup winner Yuvraj Singh, who has been promoting the company’s “professional sports blog” on Twitter since last December. This was of course not the only case where 1xBet was displayed on the OTT platform. He made several appearances in the Asian Cup and in the fifth Test between India and England earlier this year. Suresh Raina also promoted the brand’s “professional sports blog” on his Twitter account (“professional sports blog” is a substitute). What is important about the Asian Cup is that it is the first instance of a betting company as well as the OTT in question that strays from a notice issued by the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting in June. “…online betting advertisements are misleading and do not appear to be in strict compliance with the Consumer Protection Act 2019, the Advertising Code under the Television Networks Regulation Act 1995 cable and advertising standards under the standards of journalistic conduct established by the Press Council of India under the Press Council Act, 1978. In light of the foregoing and taking into account the wider public interest involved, print and electronic media are advised to refrain from publishing advertisements of online betting platforms.In addition, 1xBet raises several red flags.In 2019, the UK regulator opened an investigation before suspending all operations in the Kingdom ALSO READ | Despite I&B ministry advice, airtime for substitute betting advertising London, Russia-based betting company, was indulging in multiple their illegal activities, including but not limited to a “pornhub casino”. This is a casino that sees a person involved in assisting at the gaming table go topless to tempt more players. He also took bets on children’s games. The company has also run into trouble with regulators elsewhere. There was such a backlash in the UK that three Premier League clubs, Chelsea, Liverpool and Tottenham, had to cancel existing deals with the company. Contacted by The New Indian Express, the Advertising Standards Council of India (ASCI) expressed concern. “On the face of it, some of these ads may be in violation of different state laws because gambling is a state matter,” said Manisha Kapoor, CEO and secretary of ASCI, an agency that sets guidelines for advertising in different spheres. statement. “The MIB notice also asked broadcasters to refrain from this.” Overall, online betting is illegal in the country, so advertisements of this nature violate the laws (there are some exceptions as gambling or betting is a state subject). Raina and Yuvraj did not respond to questions. The OTT also did not respond to questions.


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